The Origins of Ritzy

Here’s what I learned this morning from Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day:

César Ritz (1850-1918), a Swiss hotelier, earned worldwide renown for the luxurious hotels bearing his name in London and Paris. (The Ritz-Carlton hotel company is a contemporary descendant of these enterprises.) Although they were by no means the first to cater to high-end clients, Ritz’s hotels quickly earned reputations as symbols of opulence. F. Scott Fitzgerald, a writer who often focused on the fashionably wealthy, titled one of his short stories “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz,” and the phrase “to put on the ritz” means “to indulge in ostentatious display.” The adjective ritzy, describing either something fancy or stylish, or the haughty attitudes of the wealthy elite, first checked into the English language in 1920.

Therefore, I can safely used the word ritzy in my Roaring Twenties mysteries!

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Published in: on November 29, 2018 at 7:35 am  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Does this make a stay at a Ritz deductible as research? 😉

    • Super idea!! I’ll speak to my accountant about it.


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