Rejection of a Roaring Twenties author

I came across these rejections of authors who began writing during the Roaring Twenties. I’ve had plenty of rejections myself, so it makes me feel good to be in such lofty company!

After 5 years of continual rejection, the writer finally lands a publishing deal: Agatha Christie. Her book sales are now in excess of $2 billion. Only William Shakespeare has sold more.

An absurd story as romance, melodrama or record of New York high life.”Yet publication sees The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald become a best-selling classic.

Rejected by all publishers in the UK and US, the author self-publishes his novel in Florence, Italy, using his own press in 1928. After being banned for nearly 30 years, Grove Press publish the controversial work in 1959. A year later Penguin finally launch the UK edition. The book quickly sells millions, as Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence becomes a worldwide best-seller.

Read other amazing (and amusing) stories about the early rejections of famous authors here. 

 

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Published in: on November 5, 2017 at 6:15 pm  Comments (2)  

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  1. Did you see this earlier today? A tribute to Agatha Christie: http://www.cbs.com/shows/cbs-sunday-morning/video/wh7unAOTO7ysFi06pY7F_m7WKI7d7cu0/all-aboard-murder-on-the-orient-express-/

    • Yeah, I’ve heard the publicity for this new film. I think I’ll really enjoy it!!


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